A few words on The Masked Singer

The Monster, one of the stars of the Masked Singer. But who are they?

***WARNING!!*** This post is about a show that is on primetime British television. As it is a post about a television show there is the possibility that it may contain content some may consider to be spoilers, although you’ve probably found out before you read this anyway. Still, it’s only fair that I warn you before you continue reading in case you haven’t because I don’t want to be THAT person. You know who I mean.

Thank you for reading. And now, here’s the post.

The Masked Singer is crazy.

Bats**t crazy.

Quite possibly the most bats**t crazy thing I have ever seen on TV.

But I’m kind of into it. Sure it isn’t high art, but TV designed for Saturday Prime time TV isn’t supposed to be. Yes it’s another show featuring people singing, but it’s ultimately a guessing game. I admit it is fun trying to work out who they are. My mum ended up making a list of all the people she thought was performing in disguise on the show (she’s about 95 percent certain that the Hedgehog is Alfie Boe, but who knows?). And the costumes the disguised celebrities wear are pretty impressive, however I imagine that at least one of the contestants are baking hot and/or struggle to go to the toilet in them.

If there’s any real criticism, it’s probably that it’s a bit too long at 90 minutes, a length no doubt made so by ITV’s penchant for putting an ad break after every performance and prior to announcing who has won the vote to the next show. There is also the chance that Mr Chow from the Hangover (who happens to be on the panel of the American version as well), could end up becoming very annoying as the series rolls on. But in all, it’s a harmless bit of cheesy fun and we all need something like that now and again.

One last thing, I’m pretty sure John Barrowman is not the unicorn. For one, it would be pretty obvious from the get go that it was him. Plus if it was him do you really think Schofield and Willoughby would have asked him if he was during the first episode of Dancing on Ice, on which he is the newest judge? They’d be stupid to try and give it away and thus ruin the outcome of another TV show, but hey, that’s just my opinion.

You decide:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVIeNMNJiIg

The Last Broadcast

This evening, the BBC are saying goodbye to Television Centre. On BBC4, I watched Madness play an excellent set in the grounds of the famous studios, while Michael Grade is interviewing some of the BBC’s famous faces on their memories of working there. While all the attention is being focussed on the BBC’s final broadcasts from its legendary home, closer to home another era in television is ending. This evening, the final edition of Granada Reports to be broadcast from Granada TV’s equally legendary Quay Street studios was being transmitted. From Monday, it will be broadcast from its new home at Media City.

Granada Studios, home to some of the world’s greatest television. Next to the Beeb.

I am sad to see Granada leave its Quay Street home. I have walked past it plenty of times over the years. My Mum and my sister both went to watch shows that were recorded at the studios. As a kid, I went on a school trip to the now defunct Granada Studios Tour. I got to walk down Coronation Street and Baker Street (as it was in Granada’s brilliant Sherlock Holmes series), wandered round a room straight out of The Return of the Antelope and watched a debate in the House of Commons. The trip fuelled my interest in television and I hoped to one day be able to walk through the corridors of Granada for real. Alas, it wasn’t to be.

My main fear for Granada Studios, is that it will end up being demolished like the BBC on Oxford Road did. I went past the site of the latter on the bus only last week and was sad to see the gaping hole (and the car park) that has been left there. As it isn’t a listed building, there is a big chance that the Quay Street site could also disappear from the Manchester skyline. It would be a total shame if ITV allowed the oldest working studios in Britain, which is probably the best known after Television Centre, to disappear. And I would hate to see it become some other pricey housing development or soulless office block that is constantly empty, even if they call it “Granada Court” or “Bernstein Towers” (after Sir Sidney Bernstein, Granada TV’s founder). As with Television Centre, why can’t they just leave them alone and let them keep making great television? It’s not that I’m opposed to change, but when things seem to be working OK, why change them?